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Hurricane Henri Update and Claim Damage Links - Public Insurance Adjusters Standby to  Help You Obtain a Fair Settlement for Your Property Damage

Hurricane Henri Update and Claim Damage Links - Public Insurance Adjusters Standby to Help You Obtain a Fair Settlement for Your Property Damage

There’s no question Long Islander’s & New Englanders endured their fair share of blizzards and wicked Nor’easters’, yet for some of our company’s public insurance adjusters who worked for northeastern clients 30-years ago after Hurricane Bob, it feels like yesterday. Making matters worse, Hurricane Henri is projected to make landfall at high tide and with a full moon and that may result in coastal flooding. Please prepare for potential days without power and stock-up sufficiently.

If you do sustain property damage, below are 2 links which will be helpful for the claims process: 

Hurricane Henry - Region II Preparations

National Flood Insurance Program Claim Forms for Policyholders

Although, Henri strengthened to a category 1 hurricane early Saturday morning, forecasters predict Henri will make landfall as a tropical storm on Sunday evening.  The peak storm surge model for Buzzards Bay and Nantucket Sound shows a 3-to-5-foot surge, but depending on Henri’s landfall, ocean water and peak surge could be layered on top of a nearly 4-foot-high tide, one of the highest of the year. 

A storm surge warning has also been issued for the south shore of Long Island from Mastic Beach to Montauk Point, the north shore of Long Island from Oyster Bay to Montauk Point, from Greenwich, Connecticut, to Chatham, Massachusetts -- including Nantucket, Martha's Vineyard and Block Island. A storm surge warning means there is a danger of life-threatening inundation from rising water moving inland from the coastline during the next 36 hours.

Heavy rainfall will also be a threat during the day Sunday and into the beginning of next week. Henri is forecast to produce rain of 3 to 6 inches over Long Island and New England, with isolated maximum totals near 10 inches. Be very careful and do not drive through deep water.

Generally, by the time storms make it to New England, they are getting picked up by the jet stream and are moving very quickly," says CNN meteorologist Brandon Miller. " It will be very rare for a storm to move this slowly over the Northeast." That means that storm surge, dangerous surf, coastal erosion and heavy rain will continue to batter New England for days instead of hours.

In Massachusetts, Gov. Charlie Baker activated the state's National Guard Friday, allowing up to 1,000 guardsmen to help with high water rescue, debris clearing, and public safety related to Henri, he announced during a news conference and said utility workers are being staged at Camp Edwards in advance of the storm. Baker urged people planning to travel to Cape Code or islands this weekend to delay their trips, leave on Saturday, or plan to extend their stay until at least Monday or Tuesday because of Henri. He asked Massachusetts residents to stay home Saturday night and remain there through Sunday, as Henri is expected to make potential landfall. 

Rhode Island Gov. Dan McKee urged residents to prepare for the storm and announced he has signed an emergency declaration to unlock federal resources to support storm response. The governor urged residents to use caution along shoreline areas due to anticipated rip currents and high surf. "Rhode Island has often experienced needless tragedy during storms when wave watchers and anglers who have climbed onto rocks near the shore get hit by waves and quickly swept out to deep water and drowned," he said. State beaches and parks will be open Saturday, according to the governor, but closed Sunday and likely Monday, depending on storm damage and required clean up.

Governor Lamont of Connecticut, said he is requesting a presidential pre-landfall emergency declaration and is issuing a declaration of civil preparedness emergency to enable the state to take any actions necessary.

A Special Note to Hurricane Damage Property Owners: Please use this website to educate yourself on handling hurricane insurance claims. Getting a public insurance adjuster involved early in your claim can help you get paid fairly and avoid claim submission mistakes we often see in catastrophe situations.  Don't wait for your claim to be underpaid or denied. A public insurance adjuster is licensed to represent your best interest, do a thorough job of documenting damages, filing and negotiating your claim with the insurer. Call us for a FREE no obligation claim review 866-281-3642 or electronically submit your property claim.

Tutwiler & Associates Public Adjusters

    New York License No: PA1097424

    Massachusetts License No: 1976722

    Rhode Island License No: 2303459

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